How Software Is Helping to Save the World | GE Software

GE Measurement and Control Nov 19, 2014 No Comments

GE Software

Posted by Deb Frodl, GE ecomagination Global Executive Director on Tue, 2014-11-04 17:17

GE software

  GE Predictivity™ Solutions Join ecomagination Portfolio It has been three years since Marc Andreessen, co-founder of the venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz, wrote his influential essay, Why Software Is Eating the World. Since that time, the impact of software in industrial applications has grown substantially. GE’s Industrial Internet is playing an important role in advancing the use of software in this arena. However, in addition to eating the world, it has now become clear that software can play an important role in helping to save the world from growing resource scarcity. The fact is, a great global resource challenge is now upon us. The demand for natural resources is outstripping available supplies in many regions around the world. Regional resource imbalances are occurring for energy, water, food, and materials. These imbalances are driving up commodity prices and creating resource stresses that have social, political, and economic implications. This challenge is poised to become even greater in the years ahead. Expected increases in gross domestic product (GDP) and population levels over the next 15 years will translate into even stronger levels of resource demand. Our analysis indicates that in the absence of additional improvements in the intensity of resource use per dollar of GDP, both materials extraction and energy consumption will increase by 80% by 2030. Ecomagination is GE’s commitment to developing technologies that reduce our consumption of natural resources, while creating economic benefit for our customers. Established in 2005, GE’s ecomagination program has been at the forefront of resource productivity solutions for a decade. Now, with the addition of the Predictivity solutions to the ecomagination portfolio, GE has an even greater potential to play a key role in responding to the global resource challenge. The integration of efficient hardware with Internet-enabled software is the new frontier of natural resource productivity. This approach provides an avenue to achieve resource productivity improvements above and beyond those that can be achieved through hardware advances alone. In a recently published white paper on this topic, we call this Digital Resource Productivity, and we believe that productivity improvements can be doubled over the next 15 years by integrating software and hardware to optimize resource use. It would appear our customers agree. In a recent survey conducted jointly by GE and Accenture and captured in the Industrial Internet Insights Report for 2015, the ability to “improve environmental safety and emissions” was chosen as one of the top three priorities for the use of big data analytics in the next 1-3 years. Some examples of how the powerful combination of big machines and big data can have real world positive influences include: Power FlexEfficiency:  Uses data sensors and data science to produce up to 10% greater turbine power output Wind PowerUp:  Produces up to 5% additional power for wind farms Flight Efficiency Services:  Results in reductions of up to 1,600 lbs CO2 emission per flight and gains of up to 2% fuel efficiency using flight and operational data Trip Optimizer:  Produces up to 10% emissions reduction and up to 10% energy savings with a sophisticated optimization solution for rail Water & Process Technologies InSight™:  Enables industrial companies to reuse municipal wastewater instead of fresh water to meet the demand for cooling At GE, we are excited about the opportunity to play a role in helping to confront the global resource challenge. Today we are embarking upon a new frontier of digital resource productivity by expanding ecomagination to encompass GE’s Predictivity suite of solutions. Join us as we help transform the future of global resource productivity. via How Software Is Helping to Save the World | GE Software.

Level Control Applications for Geothermal Power

Magnetrol Jul 07, 2014 No Comments

geothermal power example

BROCHURE :instrumentation for renewable energy

Geothermal reservoirs located deep underground provide powerful sources of heat energy. Drilling a geothermal well to a reservoir brings hot water and steam to the surface, where it is valued as a source of renewable energy. The three principal uses of geothermal power are electricity generation, geothermal heating and geothermal heat pumps. In these systems, there is a wide range of applications that require reliable level measurement and control for efficiency and safety.

GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION

Geothermal electricity can be produced at dry steam plants, flash steam plants and binary cycle plants. Dry steam plants use steam piped directly from a geothermal reservoir. Flash steam plants take high-pressure hot water and convert it to steam. As the water rises, the pressure is reduced and the water flashes to steam. Binary cycle plants take heat from the geothermal water and transfer it to an organic fluid (a butane or pentane hydrocarbon) with a low boiling point in a high-pressure heat exchanger known as a vaporizer. The heat transfer causes the second (or “binary”) liquid to turn to steam.

Geothermal heating is the direct use of geothermal heat for space and process heating applications. Industrial applications include zinc and gold mining, desalination, milk pasteurization and food dehydration.

Geothermal heat pumps use the Earth's constant temperatures to heat and cool buildings by transferring and removing heat into buildings according to seasonal needs.

Geothermal Vessels 2

GEOTHERMAL LEVEL APPLICATIONS

1. STEAM/BRINE SEPARATOR: To achieve better conditions for turbine operation, a reservoir’s steam and brine (salt water) is separated into streams where the brine water and particulate matter settle out and the steam vapors rise. The steam collects at the top of the separator where it is removed. Liquid level control modulates the amount of water that is drawn off. Recommended Continuous Level Technologies: Guided Wave Radar, Displacer Controller Recommended Point Level Technologies: External Cage Float, Thermal Dispersion

2. DEGASSER TANK: Geothermal hot water is often routed through a degasser – a large insulated tank equipped to remove organic gases and provide displacement with air or nitrogen. Degassing operations provide treatment by way of carbon adsorption, thermal/catalytic oxidization, combustion, vacuum induction or by a series of condensers. Recommended Continuous Level Technologies: Guided Wave Radar, Displacer Controller Recommended Point Level Technologies: External Cage Float, Thermal Dispersion

3. WATER STORAGE TANK: Water tanks include those for heated water, cooling water, and wastewater. Direct heat use applications require heated water storage. Spent geothermal fluids with high concentrations of chemicals are stored prior to treatment and reinjection into the reservoir. Hot water can be cooled in special storage tanks to avoid modifying the ecosystem of natural bodies of water prior to reinjection. Recommended Continuous Level Technologies: Guided Wave Radar, Displacer Controller, Pulse Burst Radar (Through Air), Ultrasonic Recommended Point Level Technologies: Float Actuated, Ultrasonic

4. FLASH TANK: Hot water from the geothermal well enters a flash tank where the reduced pressure causes the water to boil rapidly, or "flash" into vapor. Water that remains liquid in the tank is returned to the groundwater pump to be forced down into the reservoir again. The vapor from the flash tank drives the steam turbine. Recommended Continuous Level Technologies: Guided Wave Radar Recommended Point Level Technologies: Displacer Switch, Thermal Dispersion

VAPORIZER: In these special heat exchangers, the geothermal fluid heats and vaporizes a secondary “binary” fluid, which is typically an organic liquid with a low boiling point. The organic vapor drives the turbine. The level of water in the tank must be monitored. Recommended Continuous Level Technologies: Guided Wave Radar, Displacer Controller Recommended Point Level Technologies: External Cage Float, Ultrasonic

LEVEL INSTRUMENTATION FOR GEOTHERMAL POWER APPLICATIONS Screen Shot 2014 06 13 at 7.37.51 AM

Displacer Level Transmitter Technology Offers Advantages Over Torque Tubes

Magnetrol Jun 03, 2014 No Comments
digital e3 modulevelTorque tube instrumentation has been a common solution for level control applications. However, many processing plants are converting to a displacer level transmitter, which uses range spring technology, for more reliable level measurement and control. Displacer level transmitters, such as the Magnetrol® E3 Modulevel® linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) transmitter, feature greater output stability, structural integrity and ease of installation, compared to torque tubes. The following outlines why displacer level transmitter technology offers an excellent alternative to existing torque tube units.   Principle of Operation E3 MODULEVEL electronic level transmitters are advanced, intrinsically safe, two-wire instruments that utilize a simple buoyancy principle to detect and convert liquid level changes into a stable 4-20 mA output signal. The linkage between the level sensing element and output electronics greatly simplifies mechanical design and construction. Liquid level change acts upon the spring supported displacer causing vertical motion of a core within a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT). The enclosing tube acts as a static isolation barrier between the LVDT and the process media. As the core position changes with liquid level, voltages are induced in the secondary winding of the LVDT. These signals are processed in the electronic circuitry and used to control the current in the 4-20 mA output current loop. Benefits Over Torque Tubes As noted above, reliable output, structural integrity and ease of use are primary reasons displacer level transmitter technology outperforms torque tubes. Range spring technology dampens the effects of vibration and features a longer travel zone, yielding an output signal that is four times more stable than torque tubes. Range spring movement is free of wear and friction, unlike torque tubes, whose twisting motion causes friction buildup and fatigue failure. Displacer level transmitters are easier to install than torque tubes, and don’t require shutdown of process lines. Replacing Existing Torque Tubes I&C technicians who want the benefits of a range spring controller can reduce installation costs by not having to field pipe new cages. The existing torque tube cage may be used, based on the following considerations: Torque tube units should have side/bottom or side/side process piping connections. It is not possible to utilize the existing cage on a top-in/bottom-out torque tube cage. By replacing the entire unit with a complete MODULEVEL device equipped with top-in/bottom-out process piping cage connections, the process piping connection can be matched. If the existing cage has a vent connection piped into the top of the torque tube cage, it will also have to be repiped to a tee. The tee will have to be added to the top process connection on the cage side of the isolation valve or to a vent connection. The displacer length must be the same or shorter than the existing torque tube displacer. Torque tube displacers are larger in diameter than the MODULEVEL and manufactured in the same standard spans. By matching the torque tube chamber parting flange size, pressure, material, bolt circle, and the displacer span, a MODULEVEL unit can be mounted on the existing chamber. via Displacer Level Transmitter Technology Offers Advantages Over Torque Tubes.